Contact Us

We understand that every individual and every situation is unique. We are always happy for you to contact us to discuss your needs and find the best possible way we can help. 

You can call us on:

0203 130 4013

You can email us at:

info@positivemindspsychology.com

Or you can leave us a message on the contact form.

Training

We offer training that incorporates research-based information with the most current scientific evidence for best practice and applied strategies and techniques.

Our training offer includes a variety of topics relevant to the development and learning of children and young people, such as:

  • Literacy/Numeracy development and associated difficulties 

  • Social, emotional and mental health development and difficulties 

  • Understanding challenging behaviour and best practice in teaching

  • Understanding Autism and best practice in teaching

  • Understanding ADHD and best practice in teaching

We also provide training that builds the capacity of schools to use specific interventions and frameworks, for example:

  • Wellbeing Interventions: Circle of Friends, social skills groups, Circle Time

  • Literacy Interventions: Paired Reading, Reciprocal Teaching, Cued Spelling, Precision Teaching

  • Staff Support and Development: Staff Sharing Scheme, Solution Circles

We also offer bespoke training on any identified topic or question that you require. We will first conduct a needs analysis, to identify what would most usefully be included in the training, and will then conduct the research analysis and create the training package for you.

We plan, conduct and evaluate action research as requested. For example, we are able to review the effectiveness of a particular intervention in a school. 

 

We are also able to review the literature, present, and summarise the most current research on any topic within the field of educational and child psychology.

 

​Research

Selected research published by the Positive Minds Psychology Team:

Geiger, S., Freedman, R. & Johnston, L. (2015). Using action research to develop quality 16+ further education provision for young people with complex needs. Educational & Child Psychology, 32(1), 81-91. 

Guinote, A., Cotzia, I., Sandhu, S. & Siwa, P. (2015). Social status modulates prosocial behavior and egalitarianism in preschool
children and adults. PNAS, 112(3), 731-736.


Guinote, A., Cotzia, I., Sandhu, S. & Siwa, P., 'Low Status Increases Prosocial Behaviour in Children and Adults', paper presented to the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) 17th Annual Conference, San Diego, Jan. 2016.

Cotzia, I. (2014). Never Too Young for Power: Effects of Social Power on Cognitive Processing and Social Competence in Preschoolers. Doctoral Research, University College London, London.  

Cotzia, I. (2014). Which Cognitive Functions Have Been Related to Social Power in Children? Doctoral Research, University College London, London.  

Freedman, R. (2014). Can Educational Psychologists improve school support for pupils with depression? An application of the theory of planned behaviour. Doctoral Research, University College London, London. 

Freedman, R. (2014). What are the barriers that prevent teachers from supporting pupils with mental health difficulties? Doctoral Research, University College London, London.  

Hepworth, A. (2014). An investigation into the association between pupil-teacher relationships and the school engagement of looked after children. Doctoral Research, University College London, London.

Hepworth, A. (2014). Do positive peer relationships have a significant impact on the school engagement of primary and secondary aged children? Doctoral Research, University College London, London.

Cotzia, I. (2012). Children learning to think: What are the educational gains of thinking skills programs and are they sustained over time? Doctoral Research, University College London, London. 

Freedman, R. (2012). An Evidence-Based Practice Review Report: Is precision teaching an effective intervention for improving literacy and numeracy skills in UK schools? Doctoral Research, University College London, London.  

Hepworth, A. (2012). Does the Accelerated Reader Programme effectively develop reading comprehension skills in typically developing children and 'at risk' readers? Doctoral Research, University College London, London.

Training & Research